After School Program Resources

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This article looks at the findings of a pan-Alberta Advisory Committee (the Committee) that came together in 2011-12 to tackle the physical inactivity dilemma, in relation to licensed and approved child care across Alberta. The Committee worked to create a physical literacy policy for Alberta child care settings that may leverage motivation among professionals and organizations to make a difference. The purpose of this article is to share their experiences in helping to create such a policy.
This Evidence Brief reviewed the recent review-level literature on the positive impacts of PA on physical, mental/cognitive and social well-being of children and youth. It asks: What are the positive impacts of PA on heath of the whole child, i.e., including the physical, mental and social health well-being of the child? The brief considered aspects of health according to the WHO's definition: Health: A state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. Evidence...
The Government of Ontario and TO2015 have created a program to help every kid be a Pan Am/Parapan Am Kid. This means children and youth can learn about and participate in different sport, recreational and cultural activities before, during and after the TORONTO 2015 Games. Resources and activities for elementary and secondary educators, after-school leaders and recreational staff include: Kids n' Play: physical, healthy living and cultural activities My Personal Best: A tool to monitor physical literacy knowledge, set individual goals and engage children and youth to achieve...
Active for Life offers the following resources for educators, caregivers, camp leaders, and after-school program leaders who want to deliver physical literacy instruction to children. Choose from - Active for Life Lesson Plans - choose from ready-made lesson plans for ages 3-5 years, 5-8 years, and 8-12 years Build Your Own Lesson Plans - provide the age of the children you're teaching AND the skills you want to help them develop, then choose from the list of appropriate activities to get a printable PDF lesson plan in minutes. Links to More Resources
Saskatchewan in motion's Active Toy Guide features a variety of toys, for all age groups to get more kids, more active, more often. Categories include Active Stocking Stuffers, Active Classics, Active Toys, Active Electronic Toys, Active Outdoor Toys, as well as links to help your kids get the recommended daily physical activity.
This fact sheet and brochure present the Government of Australia Department of Health Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for Children 5-12 and Young People (13 -17 years) and provides further information and advice about physical activity and sedentary behaviour (sitting) for these age groups.
Speakers: Brian Torrance, Katelynn Theal Ever Active Schools explores the partnership and integration of schools as Community Hubs; detailing how schools can be fundamental to not only education but also health, active recreation and supporting socially connected communities. Schools can meet the needs of children and youth beyond curriculum. Behind a framework of Comprehensive School Health (CSH), the school community is looked upon for health promotion and improved quality of life. Teachers, parents, health professionals and recreation leaders...
This research report, conducted by Resiliency Initiatives in partnership with Parks and Recreation Ontario and its HIGH FIVE® Standard for children’s sport and recreation, provides much-needed data to support the link between resiliency in children and positive recreation experiences. The study, which involved a questionnaire and more than 200 children in recreation programs across Canada, showed improvement in core character traits such as adaptability and social connectedness after the children participated in recreation programs. Key findings also substantiated the foundation on which...
Presenters: Nancy Spencer-Cavaliere, Bethan Kingsley, Elizabeth Halpenny, Allison Pratley, Mary Ann Rintoul, Lisa Tink The purpose of this presentation was to share data from interviews with practitioners who endeavor to provide children with opportunities to engage in nature based play within Alberta out-of-school programs. Examples of the successes and challenges of affording nature play within these programs were shared along with recommendations for future practice. Presentation from the 2014 Alberta Recreation and Parks Association Annual Conference...
This activity based bullying awareness program provides in-class resources for Grades 6-8  plus an activities and games unit for Grades K-12. Educational Resources and Materials Developed by: Dr. Steven H. Kelder, Ph.D., MPH, and Joseph P. Smith. Activity and Game Section Coordinated by: John L. Smith, Former NASPE TOY.
How can high-quality arts programs attract and retain low-income urban tweens? Drawing on hundreds of interviews with young people, their families, leaders of exemplary programs and others nationwide, this report offers some answers, including 10 principles for developing effective programming. An infographic illustrating key findings, a report “knowledge-in-brief,” a video introduction and video profiles of six outstanding arts organizations offer compelling supplemental reading and viewing. Authors: Denise Montgomery, Peter Rogovin and Nero Persaud
Online webinar, 1 hour. This webinar looks at benefits, and various aspects and ways of connecting children with nature, such as through advocacy, education, built environment, technology, and more. It also reviews two best practices case studies. Presented in partnership with BC Recreation and Parks Association, Child and Nature Alliance of Canada, Educating Children Outside, and University of Victoria.
Building Corporate Relationships - A Toolkit for Nonprofits has been created to assist nonprofit organizations in their efforts to build relationships with the corporate sector. While the focus of this toolkit is the corporate sector, the same approach can be helpful in building new, or enhancing existing funding relationships with individual donors, foundations, government and other organizations. The toolkit, developed by the Alberta government, presents a five step process that helps small and mid-sized nonprofits: develop a clear picture of their organization and its role in the...
The 2014 America After 3PM report spans a decade of data chronicling how children spend the hours between 3 and 6 p.m.—the hours after school ends and before parents typically return home from work. It describes activities and supports provided by afterschool programs—including additional data on children's physical activity; snacks and meals; science, technology, engineering and math (STEM); and the outcomes and benefits associated with participation in afterschool programs.
Everyone Jump is a fun, school-based diabetes awareness program that supports educators in teaching students in Grades 1-6 about diabetes and the importance of regular physical activity and healthy eating to prevent type 2 diabetes. The cross-curricular program consists of an educator’s Program Manual, a music CD and a student Educational Challenge. On an annual basis the educator’s Program Manual is revised with updated curriculum links for the various provinces that participate in the program. Background Information Funding for Everyone Jump was originally provided to Ophea by the...
This WellSpring article outlines the benefits and challenges of using active transportation for travel to and from school. The authors offer practical suggestions for students, parents, practitioners, and the extended community to become involved in walking, wheeling or cycling to and from school. The article also provides several ideas on promoting or using active transportation beyond school communities.
This research brief defines program evaluation, addresses common concerns program managers and practitioners have regarding evaluation. It also outlines five major reasons why conducting a program evaluation can benefit an out-of-school time program.
The aim of evaluating RBC funded after-school programs was to examine the successes and challenges of offering after-school programs in Canada. The evaluation comprised two phases. Phase 1 entailed a content analysis of annual program evaluation reports submitted to RBC grant managers. Findings from this phase provided a rich description of the key outcomes and benefits of after-school programs (see RBC Foundation After-School Programs Evaluation, Preliminary Report August 2010). Phase 2 utilized data obtained through individual interviews and focus groups held with parents, children and...
Yohalem, N. and Wilson-Ahlstrom, A. with Fischer, S. and Shinn, M. (2009, January). Measuring Youth Program Quality: A Guide to Assessment Tools, Second Edition. Washington, D.C.: The Forum for Youth Investment Program This guide was designed to compare the purpose, structure, content and technical properties of several youth program quality assessment tools. Its aim is to provide useful guidance to practitioners, policymakers, researchers and evaluators in the field as to what options are available and what issues to consider when selecting and using a quality assessment tool. It...
Outcome Harvesting is a utilisation-focused, highly participatory tool that enables evaluators, grant makers, and managers to identify, formulate, verify, and make sense of outcomes they have influenced when relationships of cause-effect are unknown. Unlike some evaluation methods, Outcome Harvesting does not measure progress towards predetermined outcomes or objectives, but rather collects evidence of what has been achieved, and works backward to determine whether and how the project or intervention contributed to the change. This brief is intended to introduce the concepts and approach...

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