After School Program Resources

Library shelvesFind policies, procedural manuals and useful resources on topics including: Safety, Staffing,  Inclusion, and more. Have great resources to share? Let us know!

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The purpose of this protocol is to provide afterschool programmers with pedometer use guidelines to objectively measure if their program participants are achieving the current physical activity recommendations. These recommendations suggest that children and youth should engage in approximately 30 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, or at least 4600 steps per day during the afterschool time period. This protocol will help afterschool program staff evaluate how closely program participants achieve these recommendations. This protocol was developed for the Heart and Stroke...
This free online webinar for teachers and school staff addresses the critical components of Prevention, Identification and Management for a Diagnosed Concussion - Return to Learn, Return to Physical Activity. The content of the webinar focuses on the minimum standards as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines Concussion Protocol. 
This HC Link webinar was the third of a series of three that focused on the recommendations of the Healthy Kids Panel, which was convened to recommend strategies for keeping more kids at healthy weights. This webinar is a brief summary of report recommendations on coordinating an all-of-society approach to create healthy communities and reduce or eliminate the broader social and health disparities that affect children's health and weight. PARC/Ophea participates as one of four panel members who describe some of the capacity-building initiatives currently being implemented. Follow the links...
Includes guidelines for moderate to vigourous activity, daily and weekly, and how to assess intensity of exercise. Provides pointers for parents and caregivers in planning a teen's daily activity.
Each of these posters /executive summaries (in both English and French) provides a succinct interpretation of the issues related to the lack of physical activity for Canada's children as reported in the Active Healthy Kids Canada 2014 report card: Is Canada in the Running? How Canada Stacks Up Against 14 Other Countries on Physical Activity for Children and Youth. Intended for five specific audiences, each one summarizes the benefits of physical activity, and provides specific facts and actionable items that can help to improve children's physical activity. Move It! / Bougez!! -...
It takes support from all members of a community to raise healthy, active children and youth. The Understanding Partners Poster Series has been developed to provide base-level information as it relates to schools, public health, parents and recreation providers as partners in building healthy school communities. The supporting Tip Sheets have been developed to provide practical information for building effective relationships with each of these partners. Poster and Tip sheets may be ordered free of charge, and include: Understanding Parents Poster and Tip Sheet; Understanding Public Health...
This infographic features evidence on how physical activity and fitness may help school-aged children maximize their academic performance, and provides an overview of the effects of physical activity on the developing brain.
Ophea’s new First Nations Inspired Daily Physical Activities (DPA) resource makes it easy and fun to incorporate DPA into school or community programs for primary, junior and intermediate students (ages 5-14). The resource was developed in consultation with First Nations educators and includes 30 activity cards and related support materials that incorporate First Nations culture and traditions, as well as Ophea’s 50 Fitness Activities and Stretching Guide.
Play games that will help you learn your school subjects in a fun way! All of the games are related to citizenship, immigration and multiculturalism. Types include timed games, word finds, crosswords, and matching games.
This Lifestyle Tips article discusses what to keep in mind in working to get new Canadian youth more active, such as looking at many ways to move, getting a buddy, and more.
The SUPPORTIVE MINDS online tool provides guidance to parents who may be concerned about their children's behaviour and mental health. It is not a diagnostic tool but provides helpful evidence-based coping strategies to improve their quality of life and advice on when to seek the opinion of a doctor for a diagnosis. The tool is designed to direct you to resources and coping strategies that are recommended by Healthy Minds Canada’s team of professional contributors to its When Something’s Wrong resource handbook as well as suggestions shared by other parents and...
Help make healthy eating messages come alive for students, access vegetable and fruit fact sheets on this site! Each fact sheet also includes one or more simple activities for students.
The games, activities and this classroom guide have been developed to address the challenge: "How to make vegetables a fun and engaging topic for school children and their teachers". The games and activities have been created for school children in Grades 3, 4, and 5 to teach them about the nutritional value of vegetables, stressing the importance of having an adequate number of servings as well as a variety of vegetable types.
The Paint Your Plate! Create a Masterpiece Vegetables and Fruit Action Guide for Schools contains practical information and tools to help schools increase the amount of vegetables and fruit their students eat at school and at home. It contains curriculum-matched lessons and activities. The action guide is based on nine elements of a Healthy School Nutrition Environment and has three main sections based on the nine essential elements. Each section provides a toolkit of ideas, information and advice on how schools can promote vegetables and fruit. Activities from each section ensure that...
This article from the U.S. Safe Routes to School looks at how shared use of facilities is a promising strategy to address issues of physical inactivity and obesity, by providing children and adults with safe, conveniently located, inviting and low- or no-cost places to exercise and play. Such agreements also make sense financially because they build upon assets the community already has. It looks at challenges to shared use agreements and how to address them, as well as how they can be applied in multiple settings, such as...
Project Wild Thing is a film-led movement to get more kids (and their folks!) outside and reconnecting with nature. The film is an ambitious, feature-length documentary that takes a funny and revealing look at a complex issue, the increasingly disparate connection between children and nature. Project Wild Thing is much more than a film, this is a growing movement of organisations and individuals who care deeply about the need for nature connected, free-range, roaming and outdoor playing kids in the 21st century. The site includes links to the film, for purchase as a DVD or to be watched...
Participating in winter sports will help keep the whole family healthy, but injuries can spoil the fun. Here's how to keep kids safe during winter play.
These Teaching Tools for teaching healthy active living include: Lesson Plans:  Health Education, Physical Education Curriculum Resources for Gr 1-8;  Internet Safety (ConnectED) Gr 4-6;  Internet Safety (CyberCops) for Gr 7-8;  Chronic Disease Prevention/Awareness (Everyone Jump) Gr 1-6;  Health Education, Mental Health, Physical Education, Gr 9-12;  Inclusion, Physical Activity, Physical Education, Gr 1-8;  Health Education, Health Literacy, Personal Safety...
Active for Life has created the Skills Builder web tool so you can check how physically literate your child is. At a glance, the Skills Builder tells you what movement skills and sport skills children need to be learning each year of their development. Why is this important? Because physical literacy gives your child the best chance for lifelong health and success in every part of life. Without physical literacy, children are much more likely to be physically inactive. This can lead to lower school grades, reduced confidence, lower self-esteem, poor social skills and...
This Wellspring article notes that developing and maintaining physical literacy is a lifelong journey. There have been different interpretations of physical literacy, but experts identify that each person’s level of physical literacy partly depends on their fundamental movement skills, confidence level, degree of motivation and ABCs of movement (agility, balance, coordination and speed). 

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